Raw extracted honey filtered into buckets ready for packaging in Armstrong BC CanadaRaw extracted honey filtered into buckets ready for packaging in Armstrong BC Canada
Raw extracted filtered honey in 15kg/ 33lb honey buckets ready for sale in Revelstoke BC CanadaRaw extracted filtered honey in 15kg/ 33lb honey buckets ready for sale in Revelstoke BC Canada
Raw extracted honey in jars ready for sale in Revelstoke BC CanadaRaw extracted honey in jars ready for sale in Revelstoke BC Canada

Raw Honey

Raw honey in jars ready for sale in Revelstoke BC CanadaRaw honey in jars ready for sale in Revelstoke BC Canada

Raw Honey

Raw extracted filtered honey in 15kg/ 33lb honey buckets ready for sale in Revelstoke BC CanadaRaw extracted filtered honey in 15kg/ 33lb honey buckets ready for sale in Revelstoke BC Canada

Raw Honey

Raw Honey

BeeKind Honey

Our honey bees work hard to collect nectar from a range of floral nectar and pollen sources from; predominantly alfalfa and clover, with a blend of wildflower (lupines, daisies, red paintbrush, dandelions, willow herbs, thimbleberry, queens cup, Saskatoon and huckleberries, crocus, daffodils, pansy, hazel, St. John's wort, thistle), and numerous trees and shrubs to produce raw honey, unique to our area, between Revelstoke BC, and Armstrong BC.

In our region honey is harvested following the peak nectar flow during summer between late July to the end of August each year. We assess the needs of our apiary, understanding what is required for each colony to survive the winter ahead. We then calculate and pull the excess honey for harvest, extracting, packaging, and consumption.

The langstroth beehive design allows us to harvest the stored cured nectar that has been converted to honey through an extracting process, returning the frames back to the beehive for use again each year. There are many scales of size honey extractors, but the principle is generally the same. Expose the capped honey, and remove the liquid honey from the honeycomb through centrifugal force within a vertical or horizontal drum. Once extracted, we filter the raw liquid honey and package for consumption. Comb honey uses a frame without a foundation, or a very thin wax foundation, that the beekeeper uses to cut out and package without an extraction process ready for consumption.

The quality and characteristics of honey vary from region to region and even location to location depending on the available forage. The 3 basic categories of honey are; Single Origin, Multi-Flower, and Local, with the 3 forms being; Liquid, Creamed/ Whipped, and Honey Comb. Most often honey is a varietal blend of what is predominantly available in their area, unless a honey producer is producing a single origin variety. Some of the most common multi-floral sources in our area can include; alfalfa, clover, dandelion, fireweed, and wildflower, while canola, buckwheat, manuka, eucalyptus, and sourwood, are popular in other parts of the world.

Raw Honey FAQs

Yes. We harvest our honey late summer each year from our bee yards between Revelstoke and Armstrong BC, Canada.

On occasion, when we see that our demand is exceeding available supply we can source raw honey from our commercial beekeeping friends in the area to ensure consistent quality supply.

We currently offer bulk discount retail pricing for larger sizes, and larger quantities (cases).

As we increase our operations and annual harvest, we will be promoting wholesale pricing for business to business customers.

Please Contact Us if you're interested in discussing wholesale pricing.

Honey has a natural tendancy to gradually crystalize over time, depending on the sugar content of the nectar foraged. Some nectars will cause honey to crystalize quicker than others, along with a variety of other contributing factors.

To preserve the natural goodness in raw honey, you can place your jar in a pot of water on slow and low heat (just before a boil) and patiently wait for it to return to liquid. If you have a plastic bucket of honey, you should be able to also place in enough water that the two bottoms do not touch, and follow the same steps.

Not yet. We are working towards offering both creamed honey, and a limited supply of comb honey after the 2022 harvest.